Home
Arthritis Symptoms
Exercises
Back Pain Help
Natural Remedies
Arthritis Diet
Arthritis Herbs
Gout
Dog Arthritis
ALCAT Test
K-Laser

Our Office
Chiropractic Care
Testimonials
About Me
Read My Blog
Site Build It!
Links
Contact Us
Health In A Box


Subscribe To
This Site

XML RSS
Add to Google
Add to My Yahoo!
Add to My MSN

Subscribe with Bloglines
 

Inversion Tables - What's Out There?

There are lots of inversion tables on the market, and the trick to choosing the right one is knowing what features you need. Not everyone needs the same ones, and much of it is determined by your overall health.

This page is dedicated specifically to the different types of tables available. For a full explanation of the benefits of inversion, click here.

Inversion Table, Inversion Bench, or Gravity Boots?

Most inversion tables rest on a sturdy A-frame, with a foot stand and ankle clamps that you tighten down to lock you to the table. These tables work on a simple lever principle, and you control your speed and angle of inversion by raising your arms over your head.

Since these tables are fully contained, there's no work for you to do after the initial set up (except change the height if you let your friends use it!).

These tables have a lot of advantages. First, your back is fully supported and you are resting flat on the table. Inversion is fully controlled by arm movements, and you can take your inversion as shallow or deep as you feel comfortable. Control is rapid, and changes as quickly as you move your arms. Feel like you're too far down? Just move your arms back towards your waist to come upright again.

Inversion Benches

Inversion benches are different in that they require more work on your part to get upside down, but they can also be used for stretching and spinal extension.

This is a good option for more active people who want to combine inversion therapy with stretching and exercise. This is an active inversion therapy, and doesn't allow full relaxation of the supporting spinal muscles.

Gravity Boots

No, these aren't some space age invention used by astronauts.

Gravity boots clamp around your ankles and you attach them to a bar or a frame, and then hang freely upside down. This is the most active form of inversion and requires quite a bit of physical stamina - both to get into the boots and hanging, and then to get yourself down.

Gravity boots are NOT a good option for those with serious back complaints or physical injuries

I don't recommend gravity boots to my patients. A table is usually a better option because it requires less physical work to get into position and they're safer and easier to use.


To see my recommended inversion tables, click here.



footer for inversion tables page